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header image2000x10003 Cyber Safe Child

Cyber Safe Crest

 

CHILDREN & ADOLESCENTS

 

Technology and the internet will continue to transform the ways you learn, socialise and play. Maybe you are being bullied online, you have been pressured or made to feel uncomfortable or you may have been asked by an online ‘friend’ to share inappropriate photographs. We want you to be equipped with the knowledge to know when to ask for help. We hope you enjoying reading about the featured topics below.

 

HOW TO REPORT

 

If you have been a victim of sexting, online grooming, online bullying or you have any concern that you are being victimised via your use of the internet or your mobile, you should always report it.

Don’t suffer in silence and be a victim, you should feel empowered.

Talk to your parents or carers.

Report to MASH@DCFS.gov.ky or tel.: 945-0545 or KIDSLINE tel.: 649-5437 or the RCIPS tel.: 911. All communication will be kept confidential and you will be offered support.

Alternatively, you can speak to your school counsellor or a trusted adult.

 

 

YOU NEVER KNOW WHO IS WATCHING

There are person(s) who will use the internet, social media and chat forums to target children and young persons, for the purpose of exploiting them. One of their tactics is to reach out to you via social media (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Instagam, Snapchat etc.,) to try to become your ‘friend’.

It often starts with you receiving a ‘friend’ request, from a person ‘unknown’ to you. You’ll be tempted to accept the ‘friend’ request because the person seems to have a lot in common with you. He or she may be around your age, have a nice looking profile picture, listen to the same music as you, enjoy the same sports and you’ll probably think, why not accept the ‘friend’ request.

Be aware, that such persons will typically create a fake persona with fake profile picture to match whoever they are targeting; their aim is to increase the chances of you accepting their ‘friend’ request.

From here on in, they will work to strengthen their friendship with you, so that they are in your most trusted circle. Typically, such person(s) will be very friendly at first, but then you might find that they start to become more and more demanding of your time and in their requests. They may ask you to share revealing photographs of yourself or pressure you to turn on your webcam. They may even use your webcam to ‘secretly’ watch you, take snap pictures or videos of you, without you realising at the time.

 

What are the signs to look out for?

Pressured by an online friend, who is constantly sending you messages, or asking you to share inappropriate photographs, or making you feel uncomfortable in any way.

 

What you should do?

You should be very cautious about accepting ‘friend’ requests from person(s) that you don’t know.

You should never share sensitive or personal information or sexual images of yourself, with anyone.

If you feel uncomfortable about an online friendship, trust your instinct, ‘unfriend’ the person.

You should talk to your parents or carers.

Report to MASH@DCFS.gov.ky or tel.: 945-0545 or KIDSLINE tel.: 649-5437 or the RCIPS tel.: 911. All communication will be kept confidential and you will be offered support.

Alternatively, you can speak to your school counsellor or a trusted adult.

 

 

THE DANGERS OF SEXTING

At first engaging in sexting, which is sending, receiving, or forwarding sexually explicit messages, photograph(s) of yourself or others via your mobile, may seem like harmless fun. But it can soon turn into a nightmare, if the photograph(s) or message(s) become widely shared amongst your peer group and are posted on social media.

 

What you should know?

If you are thinking about sharing or re-posting sexually explicit photograph(s), image(s) and message(s), it is important that you realise that, it is not harmless fun and that there can be consequences for the person who is the subject of it, as well as those who share or re-post.

Remember such photograph(s) or image(s) or message(s) can be shared or reposted years later, when you have forgotten about even creating it. Remember, it is impossible remove images from someone else’s personal devices.

It is against the law to share and repost sexually explicit images of children and to use such photograph(s) or image(s) to bully or threaten. Please be aware that there can be consequence for you if you share and repost such photograph(s), image(s) or message(s).

 

What should you do?

If you are the person, whose sexually explicit photograph, image or message has been shared or re-posted, it is natural to feel a sense of embarrassment and feel regretful. But remember, whilst there is a lesson to learn, we have all made mistakes and you can get past it.

Remember, if someone forwards a sexually explicit photograph or image, you should delete it, never share or re-post.

If it is your photo, image or message being shared, don’t be a victim.

You should talk to your parents or carers.

Report to MASH@DCFS.gov.ky or tel.: 945-0545 or KIDSLINE tel.: 649-5437 or the RCIPS tel.: 911. All communication will be kept confidential and you will be offered support.

Alternatively, you can speak to your school counsellor or a trusted adult.

 

CALLING ALL GAMERS!

How does it occur?

Scammers often reach out to online Gamers, maybe via chat forums or by placing what seems like enticing offers on social media platforms or on the internet, to try and reel you into their scams.

One of the scammers’ tricks is to offer you a freebie, such as free V-Bucks! You may be tempted, but you should think twice, as there are a lot of fake websites created by the scammers. If you take the bait, you could end up getting banned from the game and even worse if it is illegal.

What you should know?

The scammer will try to use your passion for gaming and their free offers as a bait, to lure you into inappropriate chat, inappropriate sharing of images, sharing your personal/sensitive information, and keeping you up into the early hours of the morning, chatting about nothing really that important.

The freebies offered by the scammer will likely never materialise.

The scammers are often after your or your parents'/carers' credit card details, so that they can use these to steal money.

 

What you should know?

The scammer will try to use your passion for gaming and their free offers as a bait, to lure you into inappropriate chat, inappropriate sharing of images, sharing your personal/sensitive information, and keeping you up into the early hours of the morning, chatting about nothing really that important.

The freebies offered by the scammer will likely never materialise.

The scammers are often after your or your parents'/carers' credit card details, so that they can use these to steal money.

 

What you should do? you

You should also watch out for spending too much time gaming – limit your gaming time as you could easily find yourself gaming into the early hours of the morning!

You should never share your personal or sensitive information on the online gaming chat forums, as the scammers may use your information to scam, bully or threaten you later.

You should never reveal your, or your parents', credit card details.

You should talk to your parents or carers.

Report to MASH@DCFS.gov.ky or tel.: 945-0545 or KIDSLINE tel.: 649-5437 or the RCIPS tel.: 911. All communication will be kept confidential and you will be offered support.

Alternatively, you can speak to your school counsellor or a trusted adult.

 

BullYing does not just happen in the playground

 

If someone is teased, mocked, subjected to name-calling and rumors being spread via online platforms or mobile phones, this amounts to online bullying. Online bullying is just as hurtful as face to face bullying. In some respects, it is even worst, when the hurtful messages are shared and reposted to wider groups.

 

What you should know?

You should be aware that even by sharing and reposting the messages, you are creating hurt for the person, who is the subject of the bullying.

 

What you should do?

If bullying content has been shared with you, break the cycle! You should never share or repost content that amounts to bullying.

If you are the person being bullied online, you should never suffer in silence, don’t let the bully victimise you.

You should talk to your parent(s) or carer(s).

Report to MASH@DCFS.gov.ky or tel.: 945-0545 or KIDSLINE tel.: 649-5437 or RCIPS tel.: 911. All communication will be kept confidential and you will be offered support.

Alternatively, you can speak to your school counsellor or a trusted adult.